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Most HR managers have heard of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) which provides a comprehensive proof of English skills in academia and business.

 

The lead up to triggering Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon is causing confusion, even among Cabinet Ministers. Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, says that even if a trade deal isn’t in place, British businesses will be fine.

One way to understand a culture is to read newspapers. They give you a good idea of current events and the world around you. Another is to read books and novels, which helps you understand different styles of writing and introduces you to storytelling. Anyway, everyone loves a good book, don’t they?

 

Students often ask me how they can improve their English quickly. Unfortunately, there’s no ‘quick fix’, but one way learners can expand their English skills is to widen their vocabulary.

 

Following Theresa May’s recent speech, we now have a clearer idea of what Brexit means for businesses that employ non-native workers. It’s the Prime Minister’s intention to toughen up the restrictions on the number of EU migrants entering the UK and at the same time support the rights of EU workers.

 

As a follow-up to last month’s blog on sponsoring non-EU workers, we wanted to keep you up to speed with the very latest changes to the law as it currently stands.

 

If you’re about to take your Life in the UK test, you’re probably going to be nervous - everyone is. However, you can reduce your nerves, and give yourself a better chance of passing by making sure that you’re as prepared as possible.

 

Here are a few ideas that could help:

With Brexit heading our way in the next two years, some permanent residents may want to think about becoming British Citizens and taking the Life in the UK Test.

You can apply to be a Citizen if:

Pun: a play on words

Puns

 

A few months ago, we mentioned puns and wordplay in our blog about newspaper headlines. Puns can sometimes be quite difficult to understand for people new to the UK, and often tricky for those who’ve been here for a few years.

 

Two friends enjoying social media

Improve your writing skills on social media

 

Social media is great for learning English. Through platforms like Facebook and Twitter you can learn about slang, common phrases and popular conversational topics.

 

You can also improve your social writing skills, i.e. practise your writing with a group of friends:

 

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Most HR managers have heard of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) which provides a comprehensive proof of English skills in academia and business.