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BBC Radio 4’s Today programme recently reported that a growing percentage of businesses are having trouble retaining their overseas staff. It’s hardly surprising in the current climate, but wise business leaders are finding incentives for this vital part of the workforce to stay in the UK. We’ve put together a few ideas which will make you more attractive to your workforce.

 

A new English exam for medical professionals has recently been accepted by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. The Occupational English Test (OET) is lauded as a more appropriate exam for a variety of healthcare workers in comparison to the IELTS.

Have you ever noticed that when someone describes something, the word order of adjectives is often different from the way you might say it? No? You surprise me!

Listen the next time you’re having a conversation, people will use adjectives which fit into categories.

See if you can match the categories and the adjectives below. An example has been done for you:

The popularity of these relaxed conversation groups across the country is on the rise. They are generally free of charge, unusual these days, which could be why they’re popping up in universities, pubs and restaurants. So isn’t it time to set up a workplace language café at your company?

 

If you’ve made a visit to the water cooler over the last few days, you may have noticed one hot topic of conversation in the break room, particularly if many of your employees are from the EU.

Last month we looked at the employer’s responsibility to make sure their staff have the right to work in the UK, which included competency in English.  We thought it would be useful to extend this theme, so this month we’re delving into the English Language requirements for settlement  (Indefinite Leave to Remain).

 

 

What does the Gig Economy mean for overseas staff?

 

Are your workers part of the gig economy?  If you’re in hospitality or a service based industry, then the answer is probably a big fat yes.

 

The Collins English Dictionary defines the gig economy as:

 

With all the uncertainty of Brexit, your EU staff are bound to feel unsettled and out of kilter. The new proposals on the status of EU citizens in the UK have cast a shadow of doubt over their right to live in the UK. As a result they will need some extra care and attention in this period of adjustment.

 

Reliance on European and EEA labour is increasing, rather than decreasing, according to recent figures by the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Employment for non UK nationals has risen by almost 10% from the first quarter of 2016 to the first quarter of 2017.

 

Countries in Europe, flags

Following Theresa May’s recent proposals about the rights of EU citizens in the UK, we thought a breakdown of the most relevant points for businesses would be appropriate.

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BBC Radio 4’s Today programme recently reported that a growing percentage of businesses are having trouble retaining their overseas staff. It’s hardly surprising in the current climate, but wise business leaders are finding incentives for this vital part of the workforce to stay in the UK. We’ve put together a few ideas which will make you more attractive to your workforce.