English Culture is all over the Front Page!

If you want to understand English culture, it’s a good idea to start reading the newspapers. But which one? In the UK there are many different types of newspapers, from national to regional.

You can choose from:

Broadsheets

For example:

    • The Times
    • The Guardian
    • The Independent
    • The Daily Telegraph

These are sometimes called ‘quality’ newspapers and concentrate on more serious stories about current events and finance, national and international news, with supplements for lifestyle and sport.

Tabloids

Such as:

    • The Sun
    • The Mirror
    • The Express
    • The Daily Mail

These papers also cover current affairs and money, but they have many more stories about celebrities, the lifestyles of the rich and famous and general gossip. (As you can guess, more of these types of newspapers are sold than the broadsheets – we all like a good gossip occasionally!)

Local newspapers

Like these:

    • The Cornish Guardian
    • The Western Morning News
    • The West Briton
    • The Falmouth Packet

These contain stories about local and regional events and news, with some national news. (on sale in Cornwall, but you will have similar papers in your area).

Decisions, decisions…

With so many newspapers around, each one wants to make sure that people will buy their publication, rather than another. To do this they need interesting pictures on the front page, and a catchy headline to promote their main story.

The papers try to make their headline stand out, so they aim to include these things, if they can.

    • a pun or word play
    • assonance
    • allitertation
    • short words
    • large font

To get you in the mood to read, here’s a bit of work for you to do!

Reading Activity

  1. Use a dictionary to find the meaning of: a pun (a play on words), assonance and alliteration. Then choose which of these headlines matches each one. Be careful though, one headline has none of these things. For an extra challenge, if you can, explain any puns you see. Facebook your answers, and I’ll check your results.
  2. Now, make your own newspaper story here  send them to me and I can put my favourites on The English Teacher Facebook Page.

So, the next time you buy a paper, it’s worth thinking about whether the headline persuaded you to buy it.

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